Sepsis

GenMark is committed to expanding its menu of multiplex molecular panels to address clinical needs in the area of sepsis. The following information is provided as an educational resource only.

WHAT IS SEPSIS?
Sepsis is a serious disease that is usually caused by bacteria or fungi in the blood, and is the result of the body’s response to infection or trauma. Approximately 30-35% of cases of severe sepsis are fatal.1 Septic shock is a complication of sepsis that occurs when low blood pressure doesn’t respond to treatment, leading to problems in the vital organs. About 50% of patients who progress to septic shock do not survive.1

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STAGE 1:
GENERAL INFLAMMATION
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STAGE 2:
ORGAN DYSFUNCTION
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STAGE 3: 
SEPTIC SHOCK
A local infection – e.g. in the lung – overcomes the body’s defense mechanisms. Pathogenic germs and the toxins they produce leave the original site of infection and enter the circulatory system. A general inflammatory response called SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome) causes an individual organ to deteriorate or fail. Sepsis occurs when more than one organ begins to deteriorate. Septic shock occurs when multiple organs stop functioning and cardio-circulatory failure leads to a sudden drop in blood pressure.

HOW PREVALENT IS SEPSIS?
Severe sepsis strikes more than 1 million Americans every year, with similar numbers estimated in Europe.1,2 Sepsis is most likely to develop in immunocompromised, pediatric, and elderly populations; or those who have an indwelling medical device or catheter. Sepsis rates are on the rise as a result of a rising elderly population, increased longevity of individuals with chronic diseases such as cancer, technological advances in medicine that lead to more frequent use of invasive medical devices, and the extensive use of antibiotics.

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References:
1. International Sepsis Forum. (2003). Promoting a Better Understanding of Sepsis, 2nd Edition.
2. Hall, M.J., et al. (2011). Inpatient Care for Septicemia or Sepsis: A Challenge for Patients and Hospitals. National Center for Health Statistics, Data Brief no. 62.

Sepsis Infographics by World Sepsis Day is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial - ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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